Sep 302014
 
S&P500 daily at end of day

S&P500 daily at end of day

End of Day Update:

Stocks slipped on the final trading day of the third quarter, but remain inside the recent consolidation. 1,965 has been support over the last four days as the market struggles to reclaim the 50dma. But the problem for the optimist is markets usually snap back decisively from oversold levels, meaning we are not at oversold levels here. But that is only half the story.

Most of the headlines filling the front page have been bearish. There is so much political discord in the world it takes more than one hand to count all the active hotspots. We also have persistent signs of economic sluggishness. And just tonight, the potential of a spreading pandemic. But for all the negativity, the market is only a couple percent from all-time highs. Is the market being naive, or does it know something the rest of us don’t?

It is too easy to assume the market doesn’t have a clue and will eventually wake up to what is so obvious to the rest of us, but unfortunately beating the market isn’t that easy. More often than not, when we disagree with the market, we are the ones who have missed something. By default the market already knows everything we know since it is made up of people who have all the same information we do. Taper, rate hikes, Ukraine, Syria, etc. These stories have been around so long we can no longer call them news. Anyone afraid of these headlines sold long ago to someone who wasn’t afraid to own this risk. When there is no one left to sell a widely expected headline, it becomes fully priced in. When markets hold up the face of bad news and refuses countless legitimate excuses to sell off, it shows us it doesn’t want to go down. No matter what we think should happen, we have to respect the market’s resilience.

Now it’s time to resolve the contradiction between a market that doesn’t want to go down with one that isn’t oversold yet. It all comes down to timing. In the near-term, the inability to bounce decisively and put the 50dma behind us means there is a good chance this selloff is not complete. Be prepared for one more dip under recent lows and testing support at 1,950 is a very real possibility. But rather than signal the start of a larger selloff, this will be the capitulation point before rebounding to fresh highs. Expect more near-term weakness, but this is yet another buyable dip.

Jani

 Posted by at 10:26 pm on September 30, 2014
Sep 232014
 
S&P500 daily at end of day

S&P500 daily at end of day

End of Day Update: 

Stocks took it on the chin for a third day following Friday’s early surge to record highs. This dip leaves us less than 10-points from the 50dma and just above recent support at 1,980. The primary catalyst for this weakness appears to be a selloff in small-cap stocks. While the S&P500 is less than 2% from all-time highs, the Russell 2000 is off 8% and continues the shift from high-flying, speculation stocks to blue chips.

Wednesday will be an important day for the markets with a looming challenge of 1,980 support. This technical level stretches back to early July when it acted as resistance. But as we often see, resistance became support and we bounced decisively off this level a couple of weeks ago. Will selling stall and buyers step in at this level again? We will know the answer in a few short hours.

If stocks stop sliding, look for a rebound to record highs. On the other hand, failing to find support means we should expect the selling to continue to 1,950. While this sounds easy, the real challenge is not falling for the head-fake where the market dips under support, flushing out the reactive traders, before reversing and finishing the day higher. If this were easy, everyone would be rich.

Market sentiment is cooling off slightly, but it remains at bullish levels. While overconfidence could ultimately cause the demise of this bull market, contrary to popular opinion, confidence and complacency is bullish in the short-term. Confident owners don’t flinch in the face of a 2% dip to support. The lack of nervous owners keeps supply tight and props up prices. This has been the story for the last 12+ months and there is no reason to assume the tide is changing here. We continue making higher-highs and higher-lows and the best trade is sticking with what works.

Jani

 Posted by at 10:10 pm on September 23, 2014
Sep 222014
 
S&P500 daily at end of day

S&P500 daily at end of day

End of Day Update:

Stocks fell further on Monday following Friday’s reversal from all-time highs. Volume was well above average as we broke under prior support/resistance at 2k. While the daily chart gives the impression the market sold-off through the day and finished weak, the intraday chart shows we found a floor in late-morning trade and moved sideways the rest of the day. While this seems like a minor nuance, it is actually fairly significant.

The market gapped lower at the open and continued sliding fairly aggressively until just after 11am Eastern. This pushed us under the psychologically important 2k level and set off a wave of automatic stop-losses littered under support. But rather that accelerate the selloff, these stop-loss orders were the last of the selling before we found a bottom above 1,990. This weak price-action dared owners to join the selling, but most resisted the temptation and stood confidently by their positions. If this selloff chased off the weak, then all we are left with is the strong.

While I’m not super bullish on this market, the stalled selloff shows supply dried up fairly quickly and that bodes well for a bounce to new highs in coming days. If the market finds support Tuesday, then the selling is done and we are headed higher. If we breach 1,990 and continue lower, then Monday afternoon’s support was a false bottom and the 50dma is in play. Trade accordingly.

Jani

 Posted by at 9:59 pm on September 22, 2014
Sep 172014
 
S&P500 daily at end of day

S&P500 daily at end of day

End of Day Update: 

For all the hype over the Fed meeting, the market sure didn’t seem to care, finishing up a fraction of a percent. The thing we need to remember is those that hype up these events are in the business of selling eyeballs to advertisers. The more sensational they make the story, the more money they make.

The Fed did a good job of not surprising anyone and is why we finished unchanged for the day. Bulls saw what they wanted to see to keep holding and bears got what they expected and continue shying away from the market. When no one chances their mind, we don’t get the waves of buying or selling that drives price moves.

Volume was also fairly muted, only matching yesterday’s upside move. In a buy-the-rumor type of trade, we saw most of today’s strength come a day early. But that is how the market works. Wait to trade the headline and you are too late.

This was just another potential stumbling block the market put behind it. While we could not hold on to the intraday highs, this is one more bearish catalyst we can cross off the list. If this market wants to keep going higher, no matter what we think personally, don’t fight it.

Jani

 Posted by at 10:35 pm on September 17, 2014
Sep 162014
 
S&P500 daily at end of day

S&P500 daily at end of day

End of Day Update: 

Stocks bounced decisively from recent lows following some journalists comments about something. While we could waste energy talking about who said what, the only thing that really matters is how the market responded. We exploded higher because recent selling was overdone and all it took was one little catalyst to set off a buying frenzy. While bears will point to how meaningless the justification for the rebound was, they are missing the point. We didn’t bounce because of a reporter’s comments, we bounced because the market was oversold.

Recent weakness flushed out many weak holders through a series of successive new lows. The pain trade convinced many that we were on the verge of a larger selloff. But we knew this selloff didn’t have legs when it kept undercutting prior support, but didn’t trigger a larger wave of technical selling. That told us most owners were content holding and were giving little attention to this minor move lower. When the masses don’t sell, supply stays tight, and we bounce.

While the market is set up to continue higher, don’t expect fireworks. Market moves tend to be fairly symmetrical, so a couple dozen point dip is frequently matched with a couple dozen point breakout. While it seems like 2,020 is easily in reach, we need to watch how the market trades at this level before deciding what to do next. Traders have been reluctant to buy above 2k and if this trend continues, the rally could stall on a lack of demand.

Wednesday we get the Fed policy statement and Yellen’s press conference. Expect some short term volatility as some traders impulsively react to the headlines, but its been a long time since a Fed action moved the market for an extended period of time. We rallied through easy money and now we’re rallying through taper. If the Fed continues to play their cards well, this statement will be ancient history by Thursday.

Jani

 Posted by at 10:10 pm on September 16, 2014