Apr 212015
 
S&P500 4/21/2015 intraday chart

S&P500 4/21/2015 intraday chart

End of Day Update:

Stocks gave up early gains and finished near the lows of the day. The daily chart leads one to conclude this is weak, bearish price-action. But the intraday chart tells a different story. Most of the selling occurred in the first couple hours of the day after the market hit its head on 2,110 resistance. But, following the initial 11-point slide, we largely trade sideways for the remainder of the day and closed only one-point under the lows hit at 10:30am. The intraday chart contradicts the daily because it shows supportive price-action as few owners joined the morning’s selloff. When the market is given a perfect invitation to selloff, yet hold firm, that is bullish price-action even if we finished in the red.

While we cannot read too much into one day, it suggests the next few points will be higher. That is as far as this analysis can take us. We will have to reevaluate sentiment and price-action once the market tests prior highs near 2,120 before deciding to buy the breakout or sell the strength.

Jani

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 Posted by at 10:21 pm on April 21, 2015
Apr 162015
 
S&P500 daily at end of day

S&P500 daily at end of day

End of Day Update:

The market closed short of all-time highs for a second day. Depending on your outlook, this is either pausing or stalling. Volume is finally making a comeback. Yesterday’s up-day occurred in enthusiastic trade while today’s modest dip hit the average mark, something that’s been hard to do recently. This shows traders are finally starting to pay attention.

This week’s AAII investor sentiment survey mirrored the market’s gains and inched modestly in the bullish direction. The most interesting thing remains the heavy overweighting of neutrals. The historic average is 30%, yet we find ourselves over 45%. That tells us both bulls and bears are growing fatigued by this zigzagging trading range and giving up the fight. They’re not willing to change sides yet, but are far less confident in their outlook.

Technically we find ourselves near the upper end of the trading range. Two previous attempts to break 2,120 failed. Will the third time be the charm? We should know in coming days. Either way this is an important turning point for the market. If we cannot break through, bulls will likely give up and it will be a rough summer. If we smash through resistance, the nearly four months of sideways trade this year built a solid foundation to launch the next leg of the rally.

While many pundits and gurus claim to know what the market is going to do next, at this juncture it could go either way and we are best served following its lead. Buy the breakout or short the stumble.

Jani

 Posted by at 9:50 pm on April 16, 2015
Mar 102015
 
S&P500 daily at end of day

S&P500 daily at end of day

End of Day Update:

The bloodbath continued as the S&P500 smashed through all kinds of technical support. 2,060, 2,050 and the 50dma could do nothing to slow this selloff. But as ugly as it looks on a daily chart, the intraday price-action wasn’t all that dramatic. We gapped lower at the open, but quickly settled into a sideways trading range between 2,050 and 2,060 for most of the day. Those that held through the early weakness were not unduly pressured by an extended intraday slide. The lack of pain showed up in volume that failed to exceed Friday’s totals and barely finished above average. It is hard to claim the crowd panicked and rushed for the exits on such benign volume.

There are two ways to interpret this. Either the tidal wave of selling hasn’t hit yet. Or we’re running out of sellers and this thing is about to bounce on tight supply. While we can logically rationalize the latter, recent history says bottoms form on the day with largest volume of the entire move. Using that pattern as a guide, today’s lower volume selloff is likely not the end of this.

The financial press is trying to convince us the market is melting down because the Fed is moving their planned rate hikes forward a few weeks. Really? When phrased that way, it sounds just as absurd as it really is. So if this isn’t rate hikes, what is it? My money is on the surging US dollar since it pressures multinational companies’ overseas income. But while that is true, the one thing we cannot discount is the US dollar is exploding higher because we have the only global economy worth investing in. As long as global investors continue to throw money at our markets, rates will stay low and equities will keep going higher.

While we will likely see more red before this is done, I suspect we are getting close to a near-term bottom. A morning plunge followed by an afternoon bounce on tremendous volume would be the best buying invitation we could ask for.

Jani

 Posted by at 9:44 pm on March 10, 2015
Dec 172014
 
S&P500 daily at end of day

S&P500 daily at end of day

End of Day Update:

Stocks bounced decisively from yesterday’s lows, reclaiming 2,000 support and the 50dma. The 2% move was the largest gain since 2013 and came on the highest volume we’ve seen since the pullback started.

The headline catalyst was continued accommodative language from the Fed and Janet Yellen. While they didn’t specifically say recent global turmoil would delay interest rate hikes, that is the way many traders took it.

A gain is always better than a loss, but it is usually safer and more sustainable to see the market grind higher in more measured steps. Huge moves often result in equally dramatic moves in the opposite direction. That’s clearly been the case over the last three days. Will we see more of the same tomorrow? Only time will tell.

The last time we saw an equally impressive up-day was October 10th, 2013 as the market also rebounded from a dip under the 50-dma. While the market held those gains and eventually climbed another 100-points over the next two months, the moves immediately after the 2% gain were much slower. If that situation plays out again, there will be plenty of time for traders to jump on board the rebound.

The risk is if the selling isn’t over and we see another equally dramatic move lower tomorrow. Markets typically rebound quickly from oversold levels. It’s taken four days for us to reclaim 2,000 support after a couple failed rebound attempts. That shows traders previously refused to embrace the bounces. Is the third time the charm? We will find out on Thursday.

While it is okay to buy the dip, keep the trade on a short leash and don’t allow these gains to retreat into losses. Failure to continue this momentum higher is very bearish and says we haven’t found the bottom yet.

Jani

 Posted by at 10:42 pm on December 17, 2014
Nov 172014
 
S&P500 daily at end of day

S&P500 daily at end of day

End of Day Analysis:

Stocks shrugged off early weakness and finished a smidge higher, but that is all it took to mark another record close. Overnight we learned Japan unexpectedly slipped into a recession. While that sent their stocks crashing 3%, our market barely noticed, down just a fraction at the open.

The S&P500 has been unable to move past 2,040 resistance. Many traders feel this is stalling and foretells of an imminent collapse. Even though the market keeps making record highs, the Stocktwit’s SPY sentiment gauge keeps making new lows. That shows a material divergence between price and trader’s expectations.

While traders are growing suspicious of this market, it is dangerous to argue with a market that holds strong in the face of bearish news. The headlines out of Japan were more than enough to send a vulnerable market into a tailspin. Fears over global growth triggered October’s 10% selloff. But this time it barely registered as the market clearly shifted from a half-empty outlook on the global economy to one that is half-full.

Source: Stocktwits 11/17/2014

Source: Stocktwits 11/17/2014

The talking heads have a million reasons why the market is acting this way, but it really comes down to simply supply and demand. October’s selloff shook free most of the available supply. Now when the market runs into bearish economic headlines, there is no one left to sell the news and the market proves amazingly resilient. When no one sells, supply becomes tight, and prices go up. People can invent all the justifications they want, but this market’s strength comes from tight supply.

Increasing cynicism bodes well for continued gains. Even though we are at record highs, traders are selling and shorting this consolidation. Unfortunately for them, they will be the next round of buyers forced to chase the breakout above 2,050. Markets fall from unsustainable levels quickly. Holding near 2,040 for nearly over a week shows these new highs are not unsustainable. Owners can continue holding and shorts need to be very careful.

Jani

 Posted by at 10:33 pm on November 17, 2014